one hen how one small loan made a big difference read aloud

Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

Locate credible sources of information, including information gathered from web sites.

Identify goods, services, consumers, and producers in the local community. Identify characteristics of the local economy. a. This link provides a very interesting lesson plan activity to use in the classroom. Soon he is selling eggs and with the profit slowly acquires a large flock. EconEdLink provides a premier source of classroom-tested, Internet-based economic and personal finance lesson materials for K-12 teachers and their students. Use and cite evidence from texts to make assertions, inferences, generalizations, and to draw conclusions, Use and cite evidence from texts to make predictions, assertions, inferences and to draw conclusions. The picture book One Hen: How One Small Loan Made a Big Difference, written by Kate Smith Milway, takes place in Africa.

Matthew Gherman, Presenter: Compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information and text features in two or more texts. Under the drawing have them list two or more things the hen could do to help Kojo earn money.

One Hen Concepts Crossword Answers: This worksheet provides the answers to the One Hen Concepts Crossword worksheet.

Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. 4. Create your own booklists from our library of 5,000 books! [Go to school and improve his human resources and buy more chickens to get more capital resources. Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text. Because Kojo had some money and was healthy he was able to…? Explain that these cards will be mixed up and the definitions will be read aloud. Our reading resources assist parents, teachers, and other educators in helping struggling readers build fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension skills. Soon he is selling eggs and with the profit slowly acquires a large flock. ], 2.

Materials needed include: game board markers (pennies work great), game boards, and writing tools. Compare and contrast texts in the same genre on their approaches to similar themes and topics as well as additional literary elements. [Acquire more capital resources, earn more profit and eventually borrow money to buy his own chicken farm. Describe how positive and negative incentives impact choice. Identify the costs and benefits of borrowing. 5. Distinguish between essential and non-essential information within and among texts, identifying exaggeration and stereotype where present, Distinguish between essential and non-essential information within texts, identifying exaggeration and stereotype where present, Distinguish between essential and non-essential information within texts, identifying exaggeration where present, Identify and analyze relationships between characters, topics, events, sequence of events, setting, and/or plot within and among texts (i.e.

Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences and/or making generalizations from the text. Answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. Review Kojo’s story with the students by asking these “Because” questions: 1. Informational sources have unique purposes. — Roald Dahl. Recognize the difference between basic needs and wants. This lesson plan is designed for teaching grades 3 and 4.

Validity of information must be established. Summarize the main points of written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.

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How One Small Loan Made a Big Difference- One Hen Inventive, Educating, Honorable, ... Read Aloud. Teachers: View the lesson plan using One Hen: How One Small Loan Made a Big Difference. Compare and contrast the themes, settings, and plots of stories written by the same author about the same or similar characters (e.g., in books from a series). Milway explains how one small loan given to a boy in Ghana can make a large difference later in his life. Determine a theme of a text from details in the text; summarize the text. Use context (e.g., cause/effect relationships and comparisons in text) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. Book Finder c. Use the relationship between particular words (e.g., synonyms, antonyms, homographs) to better understand each of the words. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. Explain the three basic questions all economic systems must answer. Encourage them to mix their words up.

Individuals and entities endeavor to obtain goods and services and to accumulate wealth. Demonstrate the use of human and capital resources in the production of a specific good. Because Kojo’s chicken produces eggs he was able to…?

Each of the lessons includes a teacher's version as well as a student's version.

Cite relevant details from text to support what the text says explicitly and make inferences.

Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.

Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story, drama, or poem, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions). Integrate information from two texts on the same topic in order to demonstrate subject knowledge. Repeat the answer and the definition for understanding and then go on to the next student selected card.

Interpret text features (e.g., headings, graphics, charts, timelines, diagrams) and/or make connections between text and the content of text features. Organize and present information drawn from research. Note: “Stories” means narration of events told through the text types of stories, dramas, or poems. Recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and proverbs. This fictionalized story of Kojo, a boy from Ghana, who changes his world with a small loan and one hen, is based on a real person. literary elements), Identify conflict, theme and/or point of view within and among texts, Identify relationships between characters, topics, events, ideas, setting, and/or plot in and among texts (i.e. Here in a Ghanan village, young Kojo cannot afford to go to school after the death of his father.

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